Archive for the ‘Greek Mythology’ category

Watch “The Drakon” on YouTube

April 29, 2019

Loving the red eyed Drakon that Alicia gifted me with just because! I do love that woman. I had to test a few types of incense and found sum shhhhmokey stuff for my poison spitting Drakon. Now that’s fire!

Ocypete

November 11, 2015

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Hound of Zeus
Bring fourth the wrath of God

Snatcher of darkened souls
Carry evildoers off to Erinyes

Wind spirit
Swiftest of the Harpies be

Ocypete
Vicious and cruel with heavy wings

Agent of harsh punishment
Removing those devoid of light

by Felicia Lujan
11.11.2015

The Flight of Circe

September 22, 2014
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~Digital composite by Felicia~

On my way home from work, many thoughts raced through my busy head. My brain was like a swirling pool of black uselessness. Approaching 599, the state highway, I was still deep in thought when I saw a very large, white and brown, spotted, dead bird in the middle of the road. Her lovely feathers were being roughly shoved about by the wind and my heart broke to see the majestic creature deprived of life and flight. I screeched off of the road with burning rubber and instantly forgot about all of my thoughts. All that was important in that moment was getting the bird off of the road. Five o’clock traffic raced around her and I wanted to save her from being smashed under tires by all the other people who didn’t care or have time to stop for her.

I pulled over and then I noticed another car followed. It was a woman. The bird was a huge Red-tailed Hawk. One woman jumped out of the car, while her angry mother glared at me through the windshield. There were three large dogs in the hatchback. The woman had a big fast food bag ready and didn’t seem like a good person. I felt like choking her out…frankly. She ran into the road and scooped up the bird before I could blink. She spurted out over the racing traffic…”indians use these,” while she tossed the beautiful bird in the hatchback with three dogs. Indians? Dogs? Really?? So cultured and thoughtful! At that point, I seriously felt like wrestling her to the ground. I told her that she better call BLM because the bird was protected by state and federal law. I’m not sure if she knows it’s illegal to possess a dead raptor. Hopefully, she did the right thing.

When I drove away. I realized the raptor was a sign for me. I could have not seen her or pretended not to see her and just driven over her like everyone else. Why didn’t I? Why was I awakened from my pool of useless thoughts? Well…because I believe in magic. The hawk is a very symbolic bird. She is a messenger. She is a power animal with a powerful totem. Ina Woolcott once wrote that “hawk’s gifts include clear sightedness, being observant…magic, and focus.” She also said… “Hawks have a broad vision, allowing them to see what the future holds. In man this is a symbol of prophetic insight. If this gift is underdeveloped, it is common for people with this power animal to have a tendency of over analyzing everything.”

Maybe I need to see things clearly? You know? With hawk eyes. Tonight I read the “Wildlife Notes” publication put out by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. I learned that “the eyesight of a hawk is 8 times as powerful as that of humans” and that hawks “have excellent color vision extending into the ultraviolet range so they see more colors than we do.” I guess it would be easier to see illusions that way? The hawk is my new totem. Seeing in the ultraviolet range? It sounds magical doesn’t it? Ahhh…yes. Back to magic. Last night I posted I Believe in Magic” and coincidentally, there was a hawk show at the Renaissance Fair while I was there. Magic. Yes. I believe.

When I thought of the symbolism of the hawk and her magic, the first woman who came to mind was Circe. In Greek Mythology, Circe was known as the Goddess of Magic and her name means hawk. She was a bewitching nymph who was the daughter of the God of the Sun, Helios. Her magic was based on herbal potions. She was the daughter of the light in the sky. We see clearly in the daylight right? Finding the beautiful hawk was a sign. Call it the “flight of Circe.” I need to wake up and open my eyes. I need to look to those who actually cherish my magic. I am a magical being and deserve to have that in my life.

Woolcott’s symbolic interpretation of the hawk “denotes union with All That Is.” She says “the hawk is a bird of the heavens, arranging the changes necessary to prompt our spiritual growth. Having this power animal can be bitter sweet. When accepting its presence in your life, you will be asked to surrender/give up anything that doesn’t honor the integrity of all life. Whether its an idea, feeling or action. Although hard work is involved, the rewards to be reaped are great, far outweighing this.” I accept this majestic creature as my totem. I am willing to put in hard work. “Work” is my middle name. “Magic” is my last.

You

September 20, 2014

image

Electric shock right through
my spine when teeth and
shoulder meet.

A current made from a comet’s
tail travels through breasts
into my feet.

You bring down sparks with
hands like Zeus in my open,
starry sky.

Lightening strike. My lips are
yours. Cross my heart and
hope to die.

Typhon…yes~ You. You fence
me in like father monster of
the Greeks.

With just one touch, we’re on
our knees. A kiss of death will
make you weak.

Shivering still. Whisper a sign.
You are a symbol of the night.

Black hole cloak sent from the
Gods to keep you from the light.

Electric shocks all through
my heart when lips and
shoulder meet.

This current lives within my
soul, traveling through my
mind into my feet.

by Felicia Lujan
9.20.2014

White Flag Sketch

August 20, 2014

“Under the sooty flag of Acheron, Harpies and Hydras.”

~~John Milton (Comus)

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~My white flag sketch on a short break from a long strategic planning meeting. Wonder where my ruby red slippers could take me?~

Lyrical Lure

July 13, 2014

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~~~~~
Metamorphoses…hear the
siren’s song. Her haunted
lyrics reek of death.
Wings search for an
abducted soul. She infuses
darkness with her breath.
Curse of love. A melody
so sweet that the saccharin
hurts your teeth.
Muse of a world lost
in dreams and what
festers underneath.
Irresistible…call from
the depths. Siren lulling
him to keep.
Listen to her soothing
song if you fear not
becoming weak.
~~~~~~~~~~
by Felicia Lujan
7.13.2014

Fight to the Death

June 13, 2014

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I finally saw Hercules, the 2014 movie with Kellan Lutz as the son of Zeus and Gaia Weiss as Princess Hebe. It wasn’t great acting, but Kellan was better as a warrior than he is as a vampire. That’s for sure! There were two things I did love about the movie. One fight scene and one quote. The choreography of the fight scene in the colosseum when Hercules takes on the 6 undefeated warriors of Greece was awesome!

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This was yet another movie about the struggle for love. I guess you could call it a fight to the death? The only quote I noted was from Princess Hebe to Iphicles (played by Liam Garrigan). It is a lovely quote.

“I declare to you that I love another. He’s the reason I wake up in the morning and embrace the day. If you so wound him, that his face were unrecognizable to me…I would love him. If his tongue were cut from his throat and I had not his voice to delight me, I would love him. And if you make only a memory of him, I would love him even more eternally. That is what you have to look forward to.”

War Wounds

March 31, 2014

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Though the great goddess needn’t be validated by gods nor man, Aphrodite remained marked. Her treasured badge…the flawless insignia of the God of War. A potent scar seared her skin worse than the poisoned arrow Eros had laced. Twas the pierce of that very arrow which had the power to bring the hardened god to his knees in defeat. 

~~~~~by Felicia Lujan
~~~~~3.31.2014

Use the Fire

August 9, 2013

The element of fire is highly symbolic. Fire is one of four classical ancient elements. Because of this, fire has grown to symbolize many things. The symbolic element can be hurtful, but if the energy is harnessed, it can be transformed for the greater good.

Over the last few months, I have been oozing passion. Passion is a good thing, but it can draw down our energy if that passion is not reciprocal. The dictionary defines fire as: a chemical change; the emission of heat, light and flame; explosion; anger; passion; and stimulation. All of these physical definitions of the tangible element envelope the symbolism as well.

In Greek myths fire is a symbol of energy, assertiveness, and passion. The symbolism in Tarot includes conversion, passion, and transformation. Readers of the cards believe that everything that touches fire is forever changed. Transformation is always accompanied by passion and inspiration. It was interesting to learn that certain astrological signs have dominant fire personalities. These include Aries, Leo and Sagittarius.

I have felt rather fiery lately. The array of symbolism associated with the element of fire is both good and bad. In essence, fire is energy. How we decide to use that energy is important. I can either be consumed by fiery passion or I can blow out an unreciprocal flame. I can either harness the energy or face a metaphorical destruction. I choose to transform the energies afflicting me.

Today for lunch I ran a mile and then knocked out an 800 rep leg workout. I completed four monster sets of 8 different movements (200 reps each) in 40 minutes. Now that’s a leg workout! How is that for transformation? The symbolic element can hurt, but if we insist on harnessing the energy, it is transformed and will empower us. Use the fire.

Mysticism: The Power of Belief

July 23, 2013
~~~Priestess of Delphi (1891) by John Collier; the Pythia was inspired by pneuma rising from below~~~

~~~Priestess of Delphi (1891) by John Collier~~~


Since the dawn of man we have been intrigued by mystics. Today we have contemporary mystics who embrace all things divine. We are fascinated by those who can see beyond. We are drawn to those who are godlike or have heightened intuition. Their insights into the unknown and their ability to heal broken souls permeates our collective consciousness, culture and history. Some may believe that mystics see through the eyes of God. Some may believe that mystics dabble with magic. Some may believe that mystics do not exist. That is something each of us must decide for ourselves. Do those gifted with divinity walk among us? That depends on what we choose believe.

Mysticism envelopes those who are on a higher level of awareness. They see things that normal eyes either will not or can’t. They are conscious of alternate realities, yet can remain grounded. A mystic seeks and gifts others with spiritual truths, and are often believed to walk a fine line between self and the divine. Only a true mystic can master the art of transcendence. There are historic accounts of mystics who could completely absorb a deity. This enabled them to heal, apprehend extensive knowledge, see into the future or the past, deliver prophecies, dream and find the answers to mysteries.

Pythia or the Oracle of Delphi, was a priestess. She practiced on Mount Parnassus, near the Temple of Apollo at Delphi which was established in the 8th century BC. It is interesting that Pythia delivered her prophecies near a Castalian Spring. Water in itself is highly symbolic and has been used to heal, baptize, birth, and replenish those who use it. She delivered prophecies from the Temple of Apollo as it is he who inspired her visions. The mystical Pythia is said to have frantically delivered divine messages which were triggered by mysterious vapors. The vapors were released through natural formations. Some say that she simply spoke nonsense, but it was likely glossolalia or speaking in tongues.

Right here in New Mexico, a record created to assist an ethnohistorian with the School of American Research captures visits by two separate mystics (Albert H. Schroeder Papers Collection No. 1972-033, Serial No. 10706, Folder No. 427~NMSRCA). In 1969, an unknown author documented “new perspectives on the Pueblos.” In these cases, both mystics appear during the first and second world wars. This is a time of need. The mystics are both men with Christ-like features. The men pray for and heal many in Nambe, Picuris, Santa Clara, San Juan, and Taos Pueblo. These mystics were called “new prophets” by the locals. They “enchanted” and “spoke many languages,” which made them even more mystical.

Today I found myself wondering if I have ever been touched by a mystic? I am intrigued by historical and contemporary mystics who have embraced or embrace all things divine. I am fascinated by those who can see beyond. I am drawn to those who are godlike and have heightened intuition. These insights into the unknown and an ability to heal broken souls is vital to our spirits. They may see through the eyes of God or dabble with magic. I do believe they exist. Those who are divine do walk among us. That is just what I choose believe.

The Nymph Calypso and Her Stone

February 9, 2013

The back of Odysseus as he turned from Calypso.

The back of Odysseus as he turned from Calypso.

An epic poem by Homer made a mythical woman named Calypso infamous. Scholars have concluded that Homer’s poem The Odyssey (free e-book link below) was written off the Greek coast of Ionia during the latter part of the 8th century (BC). In the poem, Calypso was tragically intrigued by her legendary stone named Odysseus who washed ashore from the Ionian Sea. This poem was laced with temptation, seduction, and diversion. This makes it a classic literary piece, and so begins the Greek myth of Calypso and Odysseus.

Calypso was born to the Greek Titan named Atlas. The mythical Oceanides sea nymph lived on the island of Ogygia. Calypso is said to have had an enchanting voice. She lived in a beautiful cave near the sea. Some scholars and historians believe that the island of Ogygia was a myth, while others think it was actually located in the western Mediterranean Sea. Calypso has been seen as a negative symbol. She has been seen as a symbol of that which diverts men from their goals.

Odysseus was a legendary Greek man who was King of Ithaca. He was a hero in The Odyssey. Odysseus drifted for over a week in the sea before being rescued by Calypso. The king had lost his army and his ship after a battle with “monsters” from Italy and Sicily while returning home from Troy. After floating in the sea for 9 days, Calypso pulled him to shore and decided to keep him because she “became enamored.”

For between 5 and 7 years, Calypso refused to let Odysseus leave her island. Many scholars doubt that she actually forced him to stay and that she probably enchanted him with song. Others think that Calypso held him prisoner or hostage on her island. She offered Odysseus immortality and eternal youth in exchange for his everlasting love. The hero refused, though eventually the two made love apparently against his will.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
“Promise” featuring
Calypso and Odysseus
by Jan Styka
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It is natural for me to want to look at the woman and man in this Greek myth symbolically. Homer must have realized the symbolic power of these individuals. Odysseus is the stone. He is the hard, positive symbol of this myth while Calypso is the soft, negative symbol. The nymph is but a mere diversion in a mission for the greater good. In essence, this myth captures Odysseus as a classic hero with a noble cause, while Calypso is simply an unwanted muse who spurs distraction.

The golden kiss and enchanting voice of Calypso.

The golden kiss and enchanting voice of Calypso.

It is also interesting to see how scholars have studied the etymology of both names. The origin of the name Odysseus has been connected to two phrases amongst others. Odysseus means “he who causes pain” or “the one who is wrathful.” The name Calypso means “to cover, to conceal, to hide.” Etymologicum Magnum says that the name Calypso means “concealing the knowledge.”

In the end of this myth Calypso releases Odysseus on the sea. She does so against her will so that he can return to his wife Penelope in Ithaca. She had no choice but to do so even though she herself had become enchanted.

**Free E-book** The Odyssey by Homer courtesy of Project Gutenberg

Deflowering Virgo

August 19, 2012

I wanted to share my new colored pencil piece titled Deflowering Virgo. In her book Unearthly, Cynthia Hand wrote “I think he seriously believes that deflowering an angel could mean an eternity in fiery hell.” The ocean is a mystical place and I often feel that it is another world. Underwater we can float like angels or sink into darkness. The creatures and the colors are unreal. The unknown things lurking in the sea are frightening, yet energizing. In this piece, Poseidon, God of the Sea deflowers a Virgo in his dreams. She is symbolized by a literal flower centered with a spiral. There is also heavy symbolism tied to water. A phallic scepter wields the sign of his Virgo. I have just been having fun with experimentation. This took me about five months to finish. I worked on it on and off since March, and I finished it yesterday. I have a new piece in mind already, but I’m still working out the details in my head.


Foolish: The Illusion of Intellect

May 9, 2012

The Fool- A Tarot Card- “El Loco?”

Today I read a post about The Fool card in Tarot. One of my favorite gals- Lily Wight of The Arcade of Arts & Arcana posted Tarot art – The Fool on May 9, 2012. I absolutely loved the art work created for that card. Ms. Lily reblogged the tarot post from Tiana Setka’s Divination Blog. After reading the post, I started to contemplate what it means to be foolish? The word foolish can be interpreted in so many ways. The synonyms for the word foolish include: stupid, silly, idiotic, unwise, imprudent, thoughtless, and of course irrational. The antonym for the word foolish is simply wise. At any given time I could be described as all of thee above. Since I take pride in wisdom, how is it that all of thee above can possibly describe me? I am at a loss for words it seems. I guess that my apparent inability to explain my simultaneous identification with synonyms and an antonym for the word foolish, will insure that I remain a humble human.

In 2004, the European Psychologist Journal published a white paper titled Why Smart People Can Be So Foolish. The paper was published in Volume 9, Number 3 (2004) by RJ Sternberg. Sternberg stated bluntly in his article that “not only stupid people act foolishly.” Is that indeed a fact? I do agree. He said that smart people who “tend to act foolishly” can be connected to “five cognitive fallacies.” Those fallacies or misleading notions include unrealistic optimism. Unrealistic hopefulness and optimism come with inevitable disappointment. The author goes on to say that “the antidote to foolishness is wisdom.” Hum? Is there really an “antidote” to foolishness? Maybe I could use a dose of that antidote? What about you? Or is believing that there is indeed an antidote yet another form of unrealistic optimism? You decide…

Deane P. Lewis compiled a web site in 1999 titled Owls in Mythology & Culture. Lewis says that “throughout history and across many cultures, people have regarded Owls with fascination and awe. Few other creatures have so many different and contradictory beliefs about them. Owls have been both feared and venerated, despised and admired, considered wise and foolish, and associated with witchcraft and medicine, the weather, birth and death.” Here we see a similar pattern demonstrating a range of human characteristics which travel from one extreme to another— fear and respect, hate and love, wise and foolish, as well as birth and death.

We can also look at the myth of Pandora in regard to a wise fool. Pandora is sometimes referred to as the first of the women on Earth. It is said that Zeus himself commanded Hephaestus to create the most beautiful woman from Earth and water. To me— creating her from “Earth” would be symbolic of the human form. Think of the phrase “from dust to dust.” Hephaestus then gifted her with the breath of life. As the myth goes, Zeus wanted her to be almost perfect, and foolishly human. This woman was Pandora, and she can be seen as the fool of fools for unleashing the secrets of Pandora’s box or in some versions of the myth, a jar. The jar was as beautiful as she, but she was never to open it. She is said to have been so tortured by what may be in the jar that she felt compelled to lock the jar away in chains so that she would not be tempted to open it. Eventually, Pandora thinking she was so intelligent opened the jar. When she opened the intricate, and inviting container, Pardora simply unleashed a world of pain. What a fool!

The patterns of our human character often demonstrate such a colorful spectrum of extremes. Just as we must be born, we must die. Just as we must be loved, we must be hated. Just as we must smile, we must cry. It is unfortunate that no matter how hard we try to remain wise, the foolish illusion of intellect can blind and burn the eyes of our souls.

Lunar Bliss

April 20, 2012
Selene...Goddess of the Moon Appearing to Endymion

Selene…Goddess of the Moon Appearing to Endymion

…………………………..
Earthshine, a brightness
spectacular and keen.
Impact so deep with a lunar
bliss that is rarely seen.
…………………………..
Astronaut taste my gravity,
remaining heavy in your hand.
Open a portal to a blissful
mist in uncharted land.
…………………………..
Illumination of the soul,
licking frosting off the night.
Co-orbital, still opposites
in a never ending fight.
…………………………..
Ascend and regress my
little star, allow lunar
rocks to be kept. Brightness
built of sky and dreams,
watching as you slept.
…………………………..
Meteorites iced and heavenly,
they are molten with desire.
The dark side of the moon is
dark, still there is a fire.
…………………………..
Magnetic fields, my sun kissed
thoughts, waiting to be heard.
A tidal force is driven hard by
kinetic energy and words.
…………………………..
Solar winds, caress your
mind leaving illusions of
the moon. Reflect my spirit,
witness eclipse, and you will
surely swoon.
…………………………..

by Felicia Lujan_4.20.2012

11*****Posted using WordPress for BlackBerry*****11

The Greek Titan of Intelligence

April 12, 2012

Koios and Phoebe in the Heavens_ Digital Composite by Felicia Lujan_ Includes 1 contemporary and 1 historic image (with a shadow and screen effect).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“Again, Phoibe came to the desired embrace of Koios.”

(Greek Epic- 4th B.C.)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Intelligence, wisdom, and knowledge- these are some of the characteristics which can be attributed to Koios (also spelled Coeus). Koios was the son of Father Sky (Ouranos) and Mother Earth (Gaia). As one of the 12 Titans, (the Titan of Intelligence and an elder god) his power was derived from knowledge. He was also a “keeper” of wisdom. The name Koios is representative of one with a curious mind, and/or one posing inquires and questions. As the Titan of Intelligence, it is likely that this titan referred frequently to the written word as well as oral histories while gathering knowledge.

KOIOS (or Coeus)

This titan was also the God of the Axis of Heaven. This is that axis on which the Greek constellations revolved. Some scholars believe that Koios was likely tied to heavenly oracles, and at times it is said that he “scaled the heavens.” Koios also came to be known as Polos, and was tied to the Northern heavenly axis. It is said that the ancient ones noted that this point was “marked by the star alpha Dra in the constellation Draco.” In one Greek Myth, the brothers of Koios were personified as exaggerated pillars. The pillars were intended to hold apart Heaven and Earth.

Hemisphaerium Boreale (Greek Constellations)

Koios was married to the Moon (Phoebe), and she was a Goddess with a prophetic mind (see this post https://myvoyagethroughtime.wordpress.com/2011/12/22/enchantment-and-the-moon-a-look-at-the-greek-goddess-phoebe/). Scholars believe that this duo represented the central source of knowledge and wisdom. Both Phoebe and Koios embodied the heavens. The eventual separation of this couple was tragic. Koios was also a rebel who once ruled the Earth with other elder gods prior to being conquered by the Olympians. Eventually, he was banished to the Underworld for his role in battles with Zeus and the Olympians. I have to wonder if they had books in the Underworld?

Sources:

San Diego State University- College of Education- http://edweb.sdsu.edu/people/bdodge/scaffold/gg/titan.html#Coeus

Behind the Name: The Etymology and History of First Names- http://www.behindthename.com/name/koios

The Theoi Project : Greek Mythology was created and is edited by Aaron J. Atsma, Auckland, New Zealand- http://www.theoi.com/Titan/TitanKoios.html


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